Word of the day – Learning English online

Tháng Tám 24, 2007

pummel

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 8:07 sáng
Pronounced:
IPA: primary stresspʌməl
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stresspə-məl
Function: verb [with object]
Inflected forms:
pummels; pummeled (US) also British pummelled; pummeling (US) also British pummelling
Meaning:
1 : to repeatedly hit (someone or something) usually with the fists
Examples:
<He pummeled [=beat] the intruder.>
<She pummeled the steering wheel (with her fists) out of frustration.>

Note: Pummel is sometimes used figuratively.
Example:
<They pummeled the opposition. [=they defeated their opposition]>

Tháng Tám 22, 2007

stab

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 10:55 sáng
Pronounced:
IPA: primary stressstæb
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stressstab
Function: verb
Inflected forms:
stabs; stabbed; stabbing
Meanings:
1 [with object] : to wound (someone or something) with a pointed weapon (such as a knife)
Examples: <He stabbed her with a dagger.> <He was stabbed in the chest five times.>
2 : to poke or jab something with a pointed object
Examples: [with object] <He stabbed the piece of meat with a fork. = He stabbed the fork into the piece of meat.> <She stabbed the air with her pen as she spoke.> [no object] Note: This use of stab is followed by at. Example: <She stabbed at the dead animal with a stick.>
Idiom:
stab (someone) in the back

Meaning:
: to betray (someone)
Example: <She promised him that she wouldn’t tell but then stabbed him in the back.>

Tháng Tám 21, 2007

Obivate

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 12:02 chiều

Pronunciation: [‘ahb-vi-yeyt]

Definition: To make unnecessary or prevent (an action).

Usage: There is no semantic relation with “obvious”-beware!

Suggested Usage: This woefully underused verb is a convenient replacement for much longer and less specific phrases. Try expressions like “Lorraine’s introductory remarks obviated most of my speech” or “The new software obviated most of the jobs in his division.”

Etymology: Latin obviare “meet, withstand, prevent” from the preposition-prefix ob “to, toward” and via-re “go, travel”. Related to via “road, way” and derived from the same Indo-European source as German “Wag-en”, English “wag-on” and “way”, as well as the veh- of “vehicle”.

Tháng Tám 17, 2007

oath

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 7:57 sáng
Pronounced:
IPA: primary stressoʊθ
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stressōth
Function: noun [count]
Plural:
oaths
Pronounced:
IPA: primary stressoʊðz
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stressōthz
Meanings:
1 : a formal and serious promise to tell the truth or to do something
Examples: <The Queen required that her assistants take/swear an oath of loyalty to her. [=formally promise to remain loyal to her]> <an oath to defend the nation> Note: A person who has an important political position often takes an oath of office when beginning that position. An oath of office is a formal promise to do your job according to the law.
2 old-fashioned : an obscene or impolite word that is used to express anger or frustration
Example: <He uttered an oath and walked away.>
Idiom:
under oath

Meaning:
: making or having made a formal promise to tell the truth in a court of law : swearing or having sworn an oath
Examples: <In a U.S. court of law, a witness must swear under oath to tell “the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.”> <He said in testimony given under oath that he was not there the night of the crime.>

Tháng Tám 16, 2007

plenipotentiary

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 9:24 sáng

plenipotentiary \plen-uh-puh-TEN-shee-air-ee; -shuh-ree\, adjective:
1. Containing or conferring full power; invested with full power; as, “plenipotentiary license; plenipotentiary ministers.”

noun:
1. A person invested with full power to transact any business; especially, an ambassador or diplomatic agent with full power to negotiate a treaty or to transact other business.

There were two accounts, one in a news article, the second in the editorial section, telling the minihistory of Pol Pot, sometime plenipotentiary ruler of Cambodia.
— William F. Buckley Jr., The Redhunter

At that time, Egypt was our protectorate, which meant the High Commissioner was the plenipotentiary of George V and carried independent authority.
— David Freeman, One of Us

Plenipotentiary derives from Latin plenus, “full” + potens, “powerful.”

Tháng Tám 15, 2007

crisscross

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 3:48 chiều
Pronounced:
IPA: primary stresskrɪssecondary stresskrɑ:s
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stresskris-secondary stresskrȯs
Function: verb
Inflected forms:
crisscrosses; crisscrossed; crisscrossing
Meanings:
1 : to form a pattern on (something) with lines that cross each other
Examples: [with object] <Several highways crisscross the state.> [no object] <shoelaces that crisscross over the top of the shoe>
2 [with object] : to go from one side of (something) to the other side and come back again
Examples: <Tourists crisscrossed the lake from morning until night.> <Scientists have been crisscrossing the country to collect data.>

commensurate

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 1:28 chiều

commensurate \kuh-MEN(T)S-uhr-it; -shuhr-\, adjective:
1. Equal in measure, extent, or duration.
2. Corresponding in size or degree or extent; proportionate.
3. Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.

A new era, Hoover called it, one that was witnessing breathtaking transformations in traditional ways of life and that demanded commensurate transformations in the institutions and techniques sof government.
— David M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear

It is almost a rule: the successful American–Vanderbilt, Frick, Rockefeller, Hearst, Gates–builds himself a house commensurate with his fortune.
— Michael Knox Beran, The Last Patrician

The Shi’a represent a plurality in Lebanon, where only in recent years they have gained a degree of political power commensurate with their numbers.
— Graham E. Fuller and Rend Rahim Francke, The Arab Shi’a: The Forgotten Muslims

Commensurate is from Late Latin commensuratus, from Latin com-, “with, together” + Late Latin mensuratus, past participle of mensurare, “to measure,” from Latin mensura, “measure.”

diaphanous

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 8:33 sáng

diaphanous \dy-AF-uh-nuhs\, adjective:
1. Of such fine texture as to allow light to pass through; translucent or transparent.
2. Vague; insubstantial.

The curtains are thin, a diaphanous membrane that can’t quite contain the light outside.
— Eric Liu, The Accidental Asian

She needed more than diaphanous hope, more than I could give her.
— Tej Rae, “One Hand Extended”, Washington Post, August 12, 2001

Diaphanous ultimately derives from Greek diaphanes, “showing through,” from diaphainein, “to show through, to be transparent,” from dia-, “through” + phainein, “to show, to appear.” It is related to phantom, something apparently sensed but having no physical reality.

Dictionary.com Entry and Pronunciation for diaphanous

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)Cite This Source

di·aph·a·nous [dahy-afuh-nuhs] Pronunciation KeyShow IPA Pronunciation

–adjective

1. very sheer and light; almost completely transparent or translucent.
2. delicately hazy.

 


[Origin: 1605–15; < ML diaphanus < Gk diaphan(s) transparent (equiv. to diaphan-, s. of diaphaínein to show through (see dia-, -phane) + -és adj. suffix) + -ous]

di·aph·a·nous·ly, adverb

di·aph·a·nous·ness, noun

Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.

American Heritage DictionaryCite This Source

di·aph·a·nous (dī-āf’ə-nəs) Pronunciation Key
adj.

  1. Of such fine texture as to be transparent or translucent: diaphanous tulle.
  2. Characterized by delicacy of form. See Synonyms at airy.
  3. Vague or insubstantial: diaphanous dreams of glory.


[From Medieval Latin diaphanus, transparent, from Greek diaphanēs, from diaphainein, to be transparent : dia-, dia- + phainein, phan-, to show; see bhā-1 in Indo-European roots.]

di’a·pha·ne’i·ty (dī’ə-fə-nē’ĭ-tē), di·aph’a·nous·ness n., di·aph’a·nous·ly adv.

(Download Now or Buy the Book)

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2006 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Online Etymology DictionaryCite This Source
diaphanous

1614, from M.L. diaphanus, from Gk. diaphanes, from dia- “through” + phainesthai, middle voice form (subject acting on itself) of phainein “to show.”

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper

WordNetCite This Source

diaphanous
adjective
so thin as to transmit light; “a hat with a diaphanous veil”; “filmy wings of a moth”; “gauzy clouds of dandelion down”; “gossamer cobwebs”; “sheer silk stockings”; “transparent chiffon”; “vaporous silks”

WordNet® 3.0, © 2006 by Princeton University.

Dictionary.com Word of the Day ArchiveCite This Source diaphanous

diaphanous was Word of the Day on February 28, 2000.

Dictionary.com Word of the Day

On-line Medical DictionaryCite This Source diaphanous

diaphanous: in CancerWEB’s On-line Medical Dictionary

On-line Medical Dictionary, © 1997-98 Academic Medical Publishing & CancerWEB

commensurate

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 8:32 sáng

commensurate \kuh-MEN(T)S-uhr-it; -shuhr-\, adjective:
1. Equal in measure, extent, or duration.
2. Corresponding in size or degree or extent; proportionate.
3. Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.

A new era, Hoover called it, one that was witnessing breathtaking transformations in traditional ways of life and that demanded commensurate transformations in the institutions and techniques sof government.
— David M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear

It is almost a rule: the successful American–Vanderbilt, Frick, Rockefeller, Hearst, Gates–builds himself a house commensurate with his fortune.
— Michael Knox Beran, The Last Patrician

The Shi’a represent a plurality in Lebanon, where only in recent years they have gained a degree of political power commensurate with their numbers.
— Graham E. Fuller and Rend Rahim Francke, The Arab Shi’a: The Forgotten Muslims

sourpuss

Filed under: Word of the day — Admin @ 8:31 sáng

Pronounced:

IPA: primary stresssawɚsecondary stresspʊs
Collegiate Dictionary: primary stresssau̇(-ə)r-secondary stresspu̇s
Function: noun [count]
Plural:
sourpusses
Status: informal
Meaning:
: a person who complains and looks unhappy
Example:
<He’s always complaining. What a sourpuss!>
Older Posts »

Tạo một website miễn phí hoặc 1 blog với WordPress.com.